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Please do use this form if you would like to contact me about anything related to the content on this site or the publications i have produced. 

I am always keen to hear from people on business / speaking and writing opportunities or you just may simply want to have a chat - believe that meeting new people is the route to everything so happy to just chew the fat! 

76 St Gerards Road
Solihull, B91 1UD
United Kingdom

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This gives you an insight into Adam Hutchison including his work, life and general contacts.

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Blog

Adam Hutchison's Blog - just a little space in the world were i air my thoughts on anything and everything i am either involved in or enjoy. Many of you may wish to skip by and ignore my meandering thoughts but others may find them informative...

 

(Press Release) RISK V REWARD THE EMPLOYEE-EMPLOYER CONUNDRUM by Adam Hutchison

Adam Hutchison

Like most of us at some point in our careers, Adam Hutchison woke up one Monday morning dreading the week ahead and wondering if it was all worth it. Unlike most of us, Adam decided to take action. This book is the result …  Available Now on Amazon

Adam Hutchison has learned the hard way how to run a company and manage staff, through wide experience in senior positions in the telecoms and private healthcare sectors. Now he has distilled his knowledge and experience into Risk v Reward, a down-to-earth and straightforward account of what really matters when building a business and improving performance, including: 

Choosing, hiring, managing and retaining staff

Motivating and mentoring

Recognising and managing different personality types

Management structure and how to make it work

Creating and maintaining a culture

The author knows, from experience, that it is people that make a business great, and this book shows how to get the best out of those within your teams. 

Written by a senior executive with wide and varied industry experience. 

Will enable any junior or middle manager to get better results from staff. 

Detailed examples throughout to show how to make it work. 

Author Adam Hutchison says, “What makes a business great? The answer every time is people. People are paramount to any business. This book explores the ‘dos’ and ‘don’ts’ of successful people-management. I hope it will help managers and team leaders in businesses of all sizes. Whether they employ 5 people or 5000, my message is the same: human beings need rewards to perform well. Positive comments drive attitudes and behaviours. Forget these simple rules at your own risk!” 

About the author: Adam Hutchison, MA, BSc has spent the last 15 years working in both the private and public sectors, operating within corporate and SME environments, working at the operational level on the front line and doing everything from running departments to operating his own businesses. www.adamhutchison.com Twitter: @adamhutchison80

Media opportunities: Extracts/serialisation. The author is available for interviews. 

Local UK interest: The author is currently based in Solihull (near Birmingham, West Midlands). He has also lived and worked in London and Medway (Kent). 

To request a review copy or to be put in touch with the author, please contact

Elly Donovan PR elly@ellydonovan.co.uk tel: 0790 508 7779 / 01273 205 246 www.ellydonovan.co.uk twitter: @EllyDonovanPR facebook.com/Elly Donovan Linked-In: Elly Donovan PR 

“Keep your customers close, and your competitors closer” – Seeking innovation and collaboration in the care sector..

Adam Hutchison

Adam Hutchison – Managing Director of Belmont Sandbanks Care Group & Vice Chair of the Kent Integrated Care Alliance.

Having come from a parallel universe to the care sector, having gained my experience in corporate telecommunications. The Care industry took some getting used to, to understand it’s almost unique nature when it comes to business activities. Although the sector is heavily present in the media and has ownership from corporate VC’s and managing partners to independent businesses. The industry is very different in how it operates day to day. The standard business activities are present of course, but the sheer plethora of requirements involved in this sector are so diverse incorporating finance, construction, people management and almost most importantly high levels of regulations.

As a business sector it actually involves more facets of understanding than any other industry, as the requirements of owning a business in this sector are so broad. Although, for me personally there are 2 main themes which, are most prominent right now.

Firstly is that of collaboration, the title of this article is a play on the reality that the sector is unique in how it works when it comes to customers and competitors. This is probably the only industry in the country whereby you get the feeling that you are closer to your competitors than your customers. And when I say customers I do not mean our service users / residents for whom we care for but our stakeholder customers who fund care which is predominantly the Local Authorities. The levels of collaboration in the sector between your competitive agencies is unprecedented, with the allocation of national groups such as Care England, Care Association Alliance and the UKHCA to the local care associations such as KiCA (www.kica.care) of which I am vice-chair. The market works together to share best practice, knowledge and develop strategies to enable services to deliver the best possible care to those in need. This is something, which is sadly missed when discussing with our major customers the Local Authorities. This concept sounds alien indeed but the harsh facts of working in the care industry. Associations such as KiCA have become valued entities to bring providers together but also suppliers offering a platform for engagement to help businesses excel.

This brings to the second point of innovation, the care sector is considered to sometimes be behind in terms of innovating but this a very blinkered view. With the heightened collaboration between care providers through avenues discussed here, has created group development power to work with national organisations such as SEHTA and private suppliers to create innovative models of care and supply of services. This does not only give cost advantages but also development as by sharing best practices the products and services introduced to the market become more fit for purpose ensuring that they are of use to the sector rather than a wasted cost. Cash flow and capital is king like in any business and with the constant discussion of low care fees the search for innovative cost saving solutions are paramount to any care business strategy but its knowing what is right and when to implement these innovations. They are not just about technology the delivery of care for individuals has to be the pinnacle of each business otherwise why do it. The standard of care at present is extremely high due to great innovative thinking inside businesses that care and from agencies externally such as Ladder to the Moon who are now present on the CQC PIR as a mark of Outstanding (www.laddertothemoon.co.uk) further evidence this innovative thinking which is sometimes unheralded.

It is with the growth of local care associations / alliances, will further improve the collaboration and innovation in the care sector. Developing a long-term future of outstanding care for individuals who need it. We all know that care is inevitable and the private care sector will be leading the developments in care, encouraging from within to what is already becoming a brighter future for all concerned.

Dementia care support vs. Local Authority care & accommodation strategy: Its all about perception!

Adam Hutchison

Dementia has become a media buzzword over the last decade as the appreciation for the difficulties those who suffer with the disease has become more prominent and the understanding has increased. Many local authorities have continually identified the need for increases and improvements in the care of those with Dementia and related illnesses. Yet the real course of action is the polar opposite of this analysis. With ever decreasing care funding and the hands off approach to social care offered from Central Government officials, with the obvious downgrading of Social Care as a concern (with the greatest respect) by recent cabinet changes since Brexit – it all seems to be media lip service to a genuine social and community issue we are facing right here right now!

 

Multiple national campaigns are out there from sources such as Alzheimer’s Society and Dementia Friends as a subsidiary, focusing on some of the main points:

 

The bottom line

 

·       Dementia is a major global health problem; in the absence of a cure there is increasing focus on risk reduction, timely diagnosis, and early intervention

·       Primary and secondary care doctors play complementary roles in dementia diagnosis; differential diagnoses include cognitive impairment due to normal ageing and depression

·       Cost effective drug and non-drug interventions such as cognitive stimulation therapy exist that help to delay cognitive deterioration and improve quality of life; information provision and practical support are also important

·       Discussions about a person’s wishes for future care should occur at an early stage of illness while the person has mental capacity

·       Family carers of people with dementia are at high risk of physical and mental illness as a consequence of caring and they require equal attention and support

 

With all this in mind and the wide understanding of Dementia as growing concern in that is in the public minds the 2 issues to do have a clear synergy. The truth is that the private sector and specifically residential environments such as Care Homes and Extra Care facilities will be the ones that will and are being innovative to ensure a positive reaction to the ever growing elderly population.

 

Society will need to embrace the private care sector fully because there is simply not enough focus on how this will be funded or how the growing numbers of people that will need support. Innovative solutions are out there in every county but access to them is not evidently understood. Embracing the funding opportunities and the need to ensure that long term care financing is available is becoming a reality and not an after thought. All of us at some point will need to consider how and whom we will be paying for our care for loved ones or ourselves. The after thought that “don’t worry the government will pay” is not the case and hasn’t been for sometime. More needs to be done to aid the understanding at public level about the affordability and access to financing care in later life. With ever increasing demands being pressed and austerity measures in place as publicly indicated the overall landscape is not necessarily clear to all who are not in the sector on a day to day basis.

 

Many local authority accommodation strategies are contradictive by assessing the need for people to stay in their own homes but this is a dangerous method putting too much emphasis on time & task home care agencies who are pushed to their limits of capacity.  The fundamentals of Dementia and the needs of care in this area are around support, companionship and the need to always being available in many cases the need for one 2 one support is paramount. The question here is how can this be achieved when people are isolated in their own homes with the prospect of causing themselves more harm as their illness begins to debilitate them further over the coming months and years,

 

The stigma of care homes and care environments publicly needs to change dramatically with many private sector care organisations offering excellent care services and facilities which include not only tangible offerings such as bistros, ensuites, cinemas and medical equipment. But also the intangible benefits of 24/7 focused staff teams who are experienced in this area support backed up with external schemes offered by organisations such as Oomph! (http://www.oomph-wellness.org ) and Ladder to the Moon (www.laddertothemoon.co.uk) – who work with Care Groups to develop meaningful measured human engagement designed to enhance lives and deliver true humanistic benefits in reminiscence and responses.

 

These types of access to facilities and services are simply not available to those who are almost advised to stay in their own homes. These individuals simply miss out on the life enhancing benefits being offered in outstanding care environments across the UK. This is the ultimate conundrum – as gone are the days of the old fashioned residential home – care homes are multi purpose care services with an innovative edge focused on the person not the purse. Obviously the financials need to be right when addressing where people may spend their time living but this should not have a cost when all is considered.

 

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) the regulatory body of the are care and health services across the UK consistently backed these types of services with the increase in Outstanding services evidencing the use of innovative people engagement services in the care being delivered. Having accessing to multiple services when dealing with Dementia and associated conditions are only going to help improve the quality of life of individuals and this is clearly being demonstrated across the care sector with extreme valour. So why is it that this not common knowledge.

 

The theory I have deduced (albeit an opinion) is that professionals and government officials have not been keen enough to ensure the wider public understanding that Health and Social Care are two completely different fields. We live in a country where we are fortunate to have a National Health Service, which defies logic everyday offering FREE healthcare to all that need it. Which sadly blurs into the fact that also Social Care is an extension of health. Indeed, maybe it should be but realistically this simply is not the case. Social care is the long-term support function for health and this is becoming ever present as we develop bed-blocking problems within the NHS hospital services. Social Care can be the shining light that picks up the long-term issue and encourages development in care scenarios.

As discussed in an article that supports this statement by Paul Burstow at the Guardian: Why has this been explored more as a major political issue? Most MPs acknowledge that social care is unfinished business, but this has not translated into sufficient political pressure. At a basic level, this is because most people make no distinction between social care, care and support and what the NHS does. It still comes as a shock to many families that social care is not free. Most people make no care plans because they have discounted the chances of ever needing it.

Today the most visible advocate for social care funding is the NHS England boss, Simon Stevens. He told the NHS Confederation conference earlier this year that social care, rather than the NHS, should be at the front of the queue for financial aid. Of course there is a healthy dose of self-interest in this. Health and social care are two sides of the same coin – underinvest in one and you undermine the other.

But this is clearly down to the perception the public is given, the care sector itself and government departments must embrace social care services for what it can do but in the same breath encourage those who need to use it how it can accessed more efficiently. Private social care enterprises will be the ultimate problem solving body in this conundrum and soon everyone will need understand it!

Reasons Why Work Friends Are The Best!

Adam Hutchison

And the truth is – yes – building such relationships will open up more opportunities for you in the future…

But there are plenty of other (less selfish) reasons why your work friends are the best type of friends. Some of those reasons are…

1. They know your tea and/or coffee order.

They even know your schedule if you have one (tea at 10am, coffee at 1pm, tea at 3pm etc.)

2. They bring you food.

From fruit in the kitchen to cakes from the shop, your work friend is unlikely to pick something up for themselves without thinking of you.

3. They can be your drinking buddy.

After a tough day (or morning) at the office, sometimes all you need is a trip to the pub and a good old rant with your work friend.

The same rule applies for Friday night celebrations. And just anytime you fancy a pint down the local!

4. You’ll never lunch alone.

Unless they’re busy… at which point you’ll feel a little bit lost and wonder what on earth you should do for the hour.

5. They actually know what you do.

Come on, how many of your other friends actually know (and fully understand) your day job?

6. You can share “top secrets” with them.

Sworn to secrecy by your out-of-work friends? Gasping to tell someone? If your work pal doesn’t know them, it doesn’t count, right?

7. They’ll pump you up.

When you’re feeling nervous about a meeting/ presentation/ sales pitch etc. your work friend will spur you on and tell you just how great you’re going to be!

8. They’ll have your back.

It’s obviously always better to have someone to back up and support your ideas, opinions and sentiments. But having this back-up will also deter potential office bullies from overruling, shouting you down and picking on you (something that unfortunately does occur in offices).

9. They’ll give less biased advice.

Of course, because they don’t know your out-of-work acquaintances they can offer you (and therefore them) sound, unbiased advice about anything, without worrying about offending anyone.

10. They’ll tell you everything’s going to be alright.

When you’re having a really crappy day and it feels like everything is going wrong, your work friend will put things into perspective. Everything is NOT always as terrible as it seems (and if it is, they’ll comfort you anyway).

11. They can crack you up.

Ever been trying really, really hard not to laugh at something but failing miserably because you notice your friend’s shoulders shaking under the pressure? This usually occurs in a stressful environment – which explains why it can often happen in the middle of a meeting at work or when you’re confronted with the boss etc. Although probably not great for your professional image, it’s fun to have a laugh at work and cut through some of that tension.

12. They understand your rants.

They know exactly what you’re talking about when you go on a half an hour rant about the boss, your working hours and/or your job.

Put simply, this is something that no one outside of work will ever full understand.

13. They probably dislike the same people as you.

I’m not suggesting that you should actively dislike people at work – but if you do, then chances are your work friend will too – and it’s actually a comfort to know that you’re not alone.

14. They get you.

You’re around each other for the majority of the week, so you definitely get to know each other’s little quirks and traits; they’ll certainly know how to irritate you and how to calm you down. Work together for long enough and you’ll pretty much be able to communicate via eye movements.

15. If anything, they know too much about you.

You have to stay friends, because they know some of your deepest, darkest secrets! (Not to mention those bitchy messages you’ve sent about the boss).

And there is more thanks to Coburg Banks for their insight and Blog on the subject..