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I am always keen to hear from people on business / speaking and writing opportunities or you just may simply want to have a chat - believe that meeting new people is the route to everything so happy to just chew the fat! 

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This gives you an insight into Adam Hutchison including his work, life and general contacts.

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Blog

Adam Hutchison's Blog - just a little space in the world were i air my thoughts on anything and everything i am either involved in or enjoy. Many of you may wish to skip by and ignore my meandering thoughts but others may find them informative...

 

Filtering by Category: Workforce

(Press Release) RISK V REWARD THE EMPLOYEE-EMPLOYER CONUNDRUM by Adam Hutchison

Adam Hutchison

Like most of us at some point in our careers, Adam Hutchison woke up one Monday morning dreading the week ahead and wondering if it was all worth it. Unlike most of us, Adam decided to take action. This book is the result …  Available Now on Amazon

Adam Hutchison has learned the hard way how to run a company and manage staff, through wide experience in senior positions in the telecoms and private healthcare sectors. Now he has distilled his knowledge and experience into Risk v Reward, a down-to-earth and straightforward account of what really matters when building a business and improving performance, including: 

Choosing, hiring, managing and retaining staff

Motivating and mentoring

Recognising and managing different personality types

Management structure and how to make it work

Creating and maintaining a culture

The author knows, from experience, that it is people that make a business great, and this book shows how to get the best out of those within your teams. 

Written by a senior executive with wide and varied industry experience. 

Will enable any junior or middle manager to get better results from staff. 

Detailed examples throughout to show how to make it work. 

Author Adam Hutchison says, “What makes a business great? The answer every time is people. People are paramount to any business. This book explores the ‘dos’ and ‘don’ts’ of successful people-management. I hope it will help managers and team leaders in businesses of all sizes. Whether they employ 5 people or 5000, my message is the same: human beings need rewards to perform well. Positive comments drive attitudes and behaviours. Forget these simple rules at your own risk!” 

About the author: Adam Hutchison, MA, BSc has spent the last 15 years working in both the private and public sectors, operating within corporate and SME environments, working at the operational level on the front line and doing everything from running departments to operating his own businesses. www.adamhutchison.com Twitter: @adamhutchison80

Media opportunities: Extracts/serialisation. The author is available for interviews. 

Local UK interest: The author is currently based in Solihull (near Birmingham, West Midlands). He has also lived and worked in London and Medway (Kent). 

To request a review copy or to be put in touch with the author, please contact

Elly Donovan PR elly@ellydonovan.co.uk tel: 0790 508 7779 / 01273 205 246 www.ellydonovan.co.uk twitter: @EllyDonovanPR facebook.com/Elly Donovan Linked-In: Elly Donovan PR 

Reasons Why Work Friends Are The Best!

Adam Hutchison

And the truth is – yes – building such relationships will open up more opportunities for you in the future…

But there are plenty of other (less selfish) reasons why your work friends are the best type of friends. Some of those reasons are…

1. They know your tea and/or coffee order.

They even know your schedule if you have one (tea at 10am, coffee at 1pm, tea at 3pm etc.)

2. They bring you food.

From fruit in the kitchen to cakes from the shop, your work friend is unlikely to pick something up for themselves without thinking of you.

3. They can be your drinking buddy.

After a tough day (or morning) at the office, sometimes all you need is a trip to the pub and a good old rant with your work friend.

The same rule applies for Friday night celebrations. And just anytime you fancy a pint down the local!

4. You’ll never lunch alone.

Unless they’re busy… at which point you’ll feel a little bit lost and wonder what on earth you should do for the hour.

5. They actually know what you do.

Come on, how many of your other friends actually know (and fully understand) your day job?

6. You can share “top secrets” with them.

Sworn to secrecy by your out-of-work friends? Gasping to tell someone? If your work pal doesn’t know them, it doesn’t count, right?

7. They’ll pump you up.

When you’re feeling nervous about a meeting/ presentation/ sales pitch etc. your work friend will spur you on and tell you just how great you’re going to be!

8. They’ll have your back.

It’s obviously always better to have someone to back up and support your ideas, opinions and sentiments. But having this back-up will also deter potential office bullies from overruling, shouting you down and picking on you (something that unfortunately does occur in offices).

9. They’ll give less biased advice.

Of course, because they don’t know your out-of-work acquaintances they can offer you (and therefore them) sound, unbiased advice about anything, without worrying about offending anyone.

10. They’ll tell you everything’s going to be alright.

When you’re having a really crappy day and it feels like everything is going wrong, your work friend will put things into perspective. Everything is NOT always as terrible as it seems (and if it is, they’ll comfort you anyway).

11. They can crack you up.

Ever been trying really, really hard not to laugh at something but failing miserably because you notice your friend’s shoulders shaking under the pressure? This usually occurs in a stressful environment – which explains why it can often happen in the middle of a meeting at work or when you’re confronted with the boss etc. Although probably not great for your professional image, it’s fun to have a laugh at work and cut through some of that tension.

12. They understand your rants.

They know exactly what you’re talking about when you go on a half an hour rant about the boss, your working hours and/or your job.

Put simply, this is something that no one outside of work will ever full understand.

13. They probably dislike the same people as you.

I’m not suggesting that you should actively dislike people at work – but if you do, then chances are your work friend will too – and it’s actually a comfort to know that you’re not alone.

14. They get you.

You’re around each other for the majority of the week, so you definitely get to know each other’s little quirks and traits; they’ll certainly know how to irritate you and how to calm you down. Work together for long enough and you’ll pretty much be able to communicate via eye movements.

15. If anything, they know too much about you.

You have to stay friends, because they know some of your deepest, darkest secrets! (Not to mention those bitchy messages you’ve sent about the boss).

And there is more thanks to Coburg Banks for their insight and Blog on the subject..

Tips to Effectively Managing Remote Teams

Adam Hutchison

Working from home can be beneficial for both employee and employer, and for many, flexible working is a major determining factor in the job application process. With increasing child care costs, not everybody wishes to send their child to nursery, so working from home may be the only way people can secure an income.

Likewise, having remote workers puts less financial strain on start-ups who can save money on vital business resources which they would otherwise be obliged to purchase. Office space alone is a costly investment.

However, sometimes the problems caused by having a home working or remote team are overlooked. Too often people forget that they still have a workforce to control, and when the workforce is scattered around the country, and potentially even the world, executing an effective authoritative role is no mean feat.

Take note of the five top tips below and you should see the results in no time.

1. Put time and effort into recruiting the right people

Putting extra time and consideration into the recruitment stage will ultimately save you time and money further down the line. Home workers need to be self-motivated, dedicated and hard working so making sure the candidate fits the bill is vital. The worst thing that could happen would be to recruit someone who you are paying by the hour to lounge on the sofa watching Jeremy Kyle with their Blackberry in one hand and a pack of Hobnobs in the other. Get to know your employees on a personal level too to get a feel for their personality and strengths. Suggest an initial relaxed business meeting over lunch where you can get to understand how one another operates.

 2. Schedule weekly video conferences

Having regular face-to-face employee interaction is a vital part of any business, but when your workforce works from home, this isn’t always possible. And let’s face it, it’s not really acceptable to turn up at their house unannounced. So a good idea is to schedule weekly video conferencing calls with your employees. Software such as Skype or GoToMeeting allows for free group conversations, so if you do have a scattered team, it’s possible for you all to unite weekly to catch up and provide mutual support.

3. Embrace social media

Ditch formal communication tools such as phone and email where you can and embrace social media platforms to develop an instantaneous and more personal dialogue with your workforce. Most networks are geared up for business use. Facebook, for example, allows most files to be attached to private messages meaning the relay of information can be a speedier process. Alternatively, look at internal social media platforms like Yammer in order to communicate freely and privately.

4. Wear lots of different hats

Even though your team works from home, that’s not to say that the right procedures don’t need to be in place. This means pushing your executive role to one side and putting yourself in the shoes of metaphorical HR and IT departments. You need to take into consideration the necessary safety and security procedures, whether that be alerting your employees to the correct seating position to adopt or supplying them with the latest anti-virus software.

5. Trust your staff and allow them some autonomy

As well as geographical space, your employees also need some psychological distance. This can be difficult as it means placing your complete trust and livelihood in the hands of your staff. However, if employees feel trusted it will improve their confidence and boost their work ethic. Frequent unnecessary emails and calls checking up on them will only make them feel inadequate and could potentially result in them underperforming – something that neither of you wants.

And finally…

Work on honing your management style to a level that will be respected by your employees. The Alan Sugar approach simply won’t work on those working from the comfort of their own home.

Social care industry at breaking point due to planned increase in national living wage says Kent Integrated Care Alliance

Adam Hutchison

TV viewers fell in love with Derek, the kind care worker portrayed by Ricky Gervais, who looks after the elderly residents of the Broad Hill nursing home.

Yet Kent care bosses say jobs for people like the loveable Channel 4 character are under threat from cuts to funding and an increase in labour costs from the national living wage due in April next year.

The county’s care industry is at breaking point according to Adam Hutchison, who represents about 200 care providers across the county as an executive board member of the Kent Integrated Care Alliance.

He said private care homes will close if local authorities do not provide more money and claims the cost of caring for residents allocated through social services has been underfunded for more than a decade.

Mr Hutchison, who is director of Belmont Sandbanks Care Group, which operates homes in Romney Marsh and near Hastings, said his company receives £408.48 per patient per week from Kent County Council.

Yet his private fees for residential care range from £550 to £650 per week.

In East Sussex care homes receive £496 a week while in Hampshire the figure is £574.

In west Kent, the figure increases to £440.30.

The situation has been made worse by increases in the cost of workers.

“We need to increase what is funded by central and local government to accommodate the increase in labour costs forced on us by government...” - Adam Hutchison, Kent Integrated Care Alliance

Over the last 10 years the national minimum wage has gone up from £5.35 in 2006 to £6.70 last month, an increase of 25%. Another 6% increase will be introduced in April when the government introduces its £7.20 national living wage.

However, the Kent County Council rate for supporting residents in care homes has risen by only 5% since 2008 – with the additional cost swallowed by private businesses.

The latest increase in the national minimum wage at the start of October is expected to cost Mr Hutchison’s business £26,000 in increased labour costs. The introduction of the national living wage in April is due to up that by another £70,000.

He claims government payments need to increase by £20.52 per week per person just to stand still, with that due to increase once the living wages comes into effect.

Mr Hutchison, who employs more than 75 people, said: “As a sector we are all for the national living wage because people don’t get paid enough.

“However, how are we able to fund that? We are constantly under pressure to improve quality but we are at breaking point in care.

“The private market subsidises the social services market. Those who pay privately will have to pay more than those who come through social services.

“We need to increase what is funded by central and local government to accommodate the increase in labour costs forced on us by government.”

“We have got the national living wage and all the pressures it brings, which is probably more than the impact of the amount which can be raised through council tax..." - Cllr Graham Gibbens

“If this doesn’t happen, the short term result is independently run businesses in Kent, small family-run providers,will begin to exit the market and decide to build houses on their land or look at another form of business on the site.

“Then there will be a knock on for employment, with the long term effect larger national providers will come in and be able to charge what they want.

“We’re not trying to plead poverty but we are under pressure as a business sector.”

In the Autumn Statement on Wednesday, Chancellor George Osborne announced plans to allow councils to put council tax bills up by 2% provided all the money was used to help fund social care.

Kent County Council cautiously welcomed the move.

Cabinet member for adult social care & public health Graham Gibbens said: “The announcement was only recent and it is too early to give a forensic analysis.

“The big issue is how the 2% is going to be used but I do welcome it.

“The Government has recognised that social care does need to be funded.

“We have got the national living wage and all the pressures it brings, which is probably more than the impact of the amount which can be raised through council tax.

“One of the big things we need to do is encourage people to stay at home as long as they can and avoid going into residential care..." - Cllr Graham Gibbens

“As a local authority we have a duty to ensure there’s a vibrant social care market and we have a duty to ensure there’s appropriate funding to the sector.”

He said he would have been “very disappointed” if funding was cut and hopes to be able to increase funding in the future.

He added: “One of the big things we need to do is encourage people to stay at home as long as they can and avoid going into residential care.

"We have been quite successful at keeping people out of residential care but as people get older many do not have any other option.

“How we manage that is an issue.”

He has also approved plans to force KCC to pay the same amount to social care providers wherever they are in the county, which comes into force next year.

http://www.kentonline.co.uk/kent-business/county-news/living-wage-will-close-homes-47170/